Return to Erasure

Erasures are great when you’ve got catching up to do, but I certainly don’t think of the method as a cop-out; it can be an art form, and it definitely takes a measure of attention. I tried my hand at a few during last year’s project, and I feel a draw to return to it – admittedly, largely because I’m a bit behind on my poem count, but it’s also a lot of fun!

Number twenty-two comes from Oedipus Rex:

ode IITranscription:

Let

my words keep

pure

their

mortal

memory.

 

Time

plummets

but

will wait

for

the

desperate

poet.

 

Sacred

deeds

make

endless

words on the wind.

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3 thoughts on “Return to Erasure

    • That’s the basic idea! Longer poems (epics, poetic plays, etc.) have much more material to work with, so I find that those tend to be the ripest for mining, but depending on what inspires you, practically anything could work. I think that the more traditional approach opts for blacking out all but the selected words of the original work, but I like to leave them visible and circle or somehow highlight my chosen poem-within.

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